Archive for October 2008

Weekend Storm 10/11/08

Posted: Saturday, October 11, 2008 at 3:50 pm
By: Administrator
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A major storm system is getting ready to affect KELOLAND.  The storm will bring heavy precipitation with snow falling in The Hills and heavy rainfall everywhere else.  Winter Storm Warnings have been posted in The Hills for the possibility of 6-12 inches of snow.  Lower elevations in the foothills and out into the plains will see heavy snow at times tonight but only minor accumulations.  The rain/snow will be heaviest tonight into early tomorrow before tapering off tomorrow around midday.  For the rest of the state heavy rain will be the main story.  Rainfall totals could climb over 2 inches for many folks as this storm system passes through.  For central South Dakota the heaviest rain will come tonight and through the first half of the day tomorrow while eastern South Dakota will see some heavy rain tonight with more heavy rain expected off and on all day Sunday.  Showers will linger into Sunday night and  Monday for southeastern KELOLAND before tapering off late in the day Monday.  Thankfully next week looks much dryer with temperatures slowly climbing as well.

First Pheasant Season!

Posted: Monday, October 6, 2008 at 12:55 pm
By: Administrator
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The upcoming pheasant season has me pumped!  After living in Wisconsin for most of my life, the pheasant hunting obsession is rather new to me.  In Wisconsin it is all about deer hunting and I enjoyed the Wisconsin deer hunting season for many years but now I’ve got these birds under my skin!  It will also be the first pheasant hunting season for my wonderful yellow lab Dakota.  I am hoping she is ready but I guess we won’t truly know until we get out into the field those first couple of times.  Dakota has had quite a year, we got her last fall from a breeder in Madison, SD and she went from an adorable little puppy to a full grown hunting dog in a very short time.  I’ve had Dakota out quiet a few times this fall whether it was dove hunting or just getting her in shape for the season, and she seems to know what is going on despite how "green" her owner is!!!  Every time we went out she was able to find a couple of birds so hopefully we can keep that going into the time when I can actually carry a gun.  Then we will see how she does with the dead birds.  Either way it is going to be an awesome adventure for the both of us.  I will keep you up to date on our successes and hopefully infrequent failures.One other thing!  Don’t forget to turn to KELOLAND Weather for your Pheasant Hunting Forecast!!!  Have a great season!

Best things

Posted: Thursday, October 2, 2008 at 4:12 pm
By: Administrator
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Here are some of the things I like best about Amsterdam. I must say Amsterdam, because I have been to more rural parts of Holland several times and prefer them to Amsterdam – which, in many ways, is just a big city like New York.1) Canals. As mentioned previously, I always take the Amsterdam canal tour, and during this visit I thought about doing it twice. It is the most relaxing way to see the city, although the tourist commentary is getting a bit tiresome because they now use tape recordings to repeat each factoid several times in various tongues.2) Dress. People dress up more here. At the airport and train stations, most all workers wear suitcoats and ties. On the streat, even leisure clothing is more formal. Wearing a yellow golf shirt and shorts screams "tourist" to the rest of the world.3) Schipol. Not only is it a massive airport, but it contains a world class shopping center. While waiting for your flight, you can do souvenir shopping before hopping on the plane. It beats carrying gifts around for days. And, the worst things:1) Graffitti. Spray painted nonsense is commonplace on every sliver of concrete in Europe. It feels especially offensive in a wonderfully green country like the Netherlands. Why should they be so concerned about religiously removing empty cans and scraps of paper off the streets, when it still looks so messy with graffitti scrawled on every vertical surface?2) Fake authenticity. Any restaurant with a sign out front that proclaims "genuine Dutch" or "real Dutch" written in English probably isn’t. 3) Public bathrooms. 50 eurocents (75 US cents) entrance fee. Exact change required.
Travel tip: I know at least one Sioux Falls bank has euros (European currency) for sale. I recommend doing this, since there is a per-day limitation on how much you can withdraw from cash machines in Europe, and you have to pay a transaction fee (about five dollars) each time you use a foreign ATM. Plus, it is nice to have money when the hit the ground so you do not have to visit an airport bank to get money to pay for the train or taxi.

Wet days in Holland

Posted: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 at 2:34 pm
By: Administrator
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Weather has turned autumnlike in Holland. Rainy, windy, cool – and the forecast expects it to stay that way. Occasional downpours have made it unpleasant to walk too far, and falling leaves have made the sidewalks slippery. This is probably what one should expect with a cold front coming off the North Sea.
The chill outdoors is in contrast to the conference of the European Meteorological Society, where the main topic of discussion is climate change. In Europe, debate about whether there is man-made climate change is long over. The scientists here have moved on to how serious global warming will be, and whether anything can be done about it.
I was not involved in the climate discussions. My presentation was about severe weather at the "media and communication" session. I show my fellow meteorologists a number of video clips involving radar (which is almost never shown on TV in Europe) and samples of our storm reports from the field with severestudios.com chasers Kory Hartman and Kenny Allen. It is such a foreign concept to the Europeans, who do not cover severe weather like we do in the States. In fact, in many countries the nightly weathercast is taped a few hours in advance – though that practice seems to be diminishing. The continent has even implemented a system of weather warnings, somewhat like in America.
One real classy thing about Amsterdam: The cabbies wear dress shirts and ties. Really. This ain’t New York City.