Archive for October 2011

My Checkered Past

Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 at 3:44 pm
By: Doug Lund
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It’s always fun to read people’s comments whenever I post old Keloland TV photos on my blog or Facebook page. Most seem to enjoy those little jaunts down memory lane. I have lots of pictures and plenty of stories to go with them so expect a few more in the weeks and months ahead; including today.     With Halloween just around the corner, I got to thinking about all the spooky assignments I’ve covered in connection with the holiday; from Jack-O-Lantern collections pumpkin carving contests, bizarre trick or treat masks, cemetery ghost tours and, of course, the annual Jaycee haunted house. This is a photo of me surrounded by the haunted house residents in 1978.

 checked jacket spooks

I didn’t realize it at the time but a favorite sport jacket of mine that I wore a lot on the air during the early part of my broadcasting career would go on to become a much sought-after and treasured Halloween costume for generations to come.

checked jacket at work 

I don’t remember exactly when or where I purchased my checkered beauty but I liked the fit and, since I couldn’t afford a vast wardrobe, it found it’s way on the air at least once a week.  The directors hated it because the tight-checked pattern played tricks with the cameras resulting in a swirling kaleidoscope effect on TV. The general manager never told me straight out that my jacket was hypnotizing our viewers and to stop wearing it but before long he announced that the company was going to buy some jackets for the anchors to wear on air.  So, off we went to be fitted and later to have our wives sew on a circular patch for the pocket that had Keloland News embroidered on it ala Ted Baxter from the Mary Tyler Moore show.

I believe we each received two jackets; one Kelly Green, the other sort of a light maroon color. The experiment didn’t last long, however, because none of us could remember what color to wear on what night. Besides, Jim Burt had a closet full of his trademark plaid/tartan jackets he wanted to keep wearing and these were just too plain.   It was the end, though, for my checkered sport coat which wound up in MY closet next to the red tuxedo jacket and a half dozen leisure suits.  At least I THOUGHT that was its final resting place but when our desert daughter, Christy, was still living at home, she asked her mom to help find something different to wear for a Halloween party. Without a lot of hesitation, Linda thought of that old jacket of mine and this was the result.

 checked jacket christy

A few years later, it came out of the closet again when Linda needed to dress up at work for Halloween. I don’t understand how she could ever think my sweet old jacket completed the hobo look she was going for but…..

 checked jacket Linda alone

Linda’s outfit proved to be so popular with her colleagues that one of them..Patsy.. asked to borrow the jacket for HER Halloween party.

 checked jacket Patsy Fahendorf

“I think it’s still in the bottom of a barrel downstairs,” Linda said the other day when I asked about my much maligned jacket. But while in the process of looking, she remembered she had loaned it out a long time ago to somebody else for a costume but it never came back. Who ever borrowed it might have figured the thing wasn’t too valuable..OR, did they realize it WAS and put it on Ebay.

 checkered on ebay

Can’t be sure it’s mine, of course, but the size is right and, if you look closely there appears to be an old hobo make-up smudge on the lapel. Wonder if I can get it here in time for Halloween Monday night.

Honey, can I borrow 40 bucks?

Turn, Turn, Turn

Posted: Monday, October 24, 2011 at 10:00 am
By: Doug Lund
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“Honey, have you seen the tree in the neighbor’s yard across the street?” Linda  said this morning while pouring me a second cup of coffee.  “The house that’s for sale?” I said. “Yeah, come take a look. We’ve lived here for decades and I don’t ever remember those leaves turning such a beautiful color.”

neighbors tree 003

After our recent New England trip, I guess we consider ourselves to be experts in the art of fall foliage appreciation. Just as impressive to me, though, was my wife’s cheerful disposition.  We don’t have knock down drag outs when there’s a disagreement. (okay, fight) It just gets mighty quiet around the house until one of us breaks the ice. There’s usually a mutual apology and that’s pretty much the end of it.  

Our troubles began a few days ago when we met up with friends, Denny and Joan, for a drink at one of our favorite local establishments. As we were chatting, a lady from the next table came over to ours insisting that she knows Joanie from bowling years and years ago. Joan politely said she didn’t remember but the lady kept coming over insisting they were long lost buddies. Then she came over to me and said, “Hey, aren’t you the guy from TV?” I believed she called me Dave. When I said yes, I extended my hand and, with a note of sarcasm, insisted she tell me her name. Instead of conveying the message that her regular trips to our table were becoming annoying, she felt comfortable enough in our relationship to come over one more time to tell me about some wonderful new diet supplement she was selling guaranteed to improve my health. (Lose weight)  It was at this point that I’d had enough and, boosted by the bravado that only happy hour beverages provide, I told her I wanted no part of her pyramid scheme, asked her to leave and bother us no more. Linda..who is a good person and hates conflict and public embarrassment,  wasn’t too pleased with how I handled the situation and indicated as much. Since I had my own transportation, I left and that’s how it came to be a bit chilly and quiet around our house this weekend.

“That tree really is pretty, I said, especially in contrast to the yellow-leaf maple in our own front yard.”

“I love you, you know.”

“I  love you too.”

All Set? You Bet!

Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 at 1:48 pm
By: Doug Lund
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There are a few special privileges granted to old Keloland TV relics like me; one of them was getting a sneak peak at the brand new broadcast studio especially designed for the transformation to all high definition Wednesday at five. I popped in just as they were rehearsing Midday in Keloland and was blown away by all the changes..not only in the news and weather sets but behind the scenes where the directors, producers, engineers and other technicians now operate.  Don Jorgenson was waiting in the wings for his turn to rehearse and we had a chance to chat. “Did you see the wall behind the anchor desk?” he said, “It one giant HD monitor. Plus we won’t have cameramen (or women) anymore; the new HD cameras are operated by remote control. Plus the anchors will be using ipads at the desk instead of the old paper scripts.”  “Sounds dangerously high tech,” I said.    Just then Nicole Winters, who I think is just terrific on camera, wrapped up her rehearsal. I never had a chance to work with Nicole but have gotten to know her a little bit from when I show up at the station to do my “Voice of Keloland” thing.  “Doug, do you want to take a spin at your old anchor chair?” she asked.

Just then, my mind raced back to 1975 when Keloland TV was about to unveil a brand new set, a brand new format ( The Big News) a brand new anchorman. (Me)  I remember being as nervous as a June bride in a feather bed but after a few newscasts, the four of us: Steve Hemmingsen, Jim Burt, Dave Dedrick and I all fell into a good rhythm that worked and lasted for a very long time.

This was my very first Keloland TV new set in 1975. It was a real departure from the podiums and single desks other anchors had used. I remember our promotion guy had the brilliant idea that Jim Burt, Steve Hemmingsen, Dave Dedrick and I march on to the set while the opening music played. It looked like we were heading to a police line-up. That walking entry only lasted a few months but the set itself was in place for several years.

This was my very first Keloland TV new set in 1975. It was a real departure from the podiums and single desks other anchors had used. I remember our promotion guy had the brilliant idea that Jim Burt, Steve Hemmingsen, Dave Dedrick and I march on to the set while the opening music played. It looked like we were heading to a police line-up. That walking entry only lasted a few months but the set itself was in place for several years.

I was trying to recall the number of different sets we went through during my tenure. There actually weren’t that many..maybe five or six over thirty seven years.

This was our next set built at the other end of the studio. Originally it had a huge kite-shaped piece of plexiglass with the words "The Big News" attached in styrofoam letters. It was suspended from the ceiling by a few chains and we all lived in fear that it would come crashing down on our heads on any given night. It was a nightmare for engineers to light and, after a year or so, we had the technology to achieve the same effect graphically. Nobody was sad to see that big overhang go. I know I have a picture of it somewhere but can't find.

The above set was somewhere in the late 70′s  Pretty ho-hum really but we used it for a long time. I think it ended up at OWL TV

And then there was the kite set. It originally it had a huge kite-shaped piece of plexiglass with the words "The Big News" attached in styrofoam letters. It was suspended from the ceiling by a few chains and we all lived in fear that it would come crashing down on our heads on any given night. It was a nightmare for engineers to light and, after a year or so, we had the technology to achieve the same effect graphically. Nobody was sad to see that big overhang go.

And then there was the kite set. It originally it had a huge kite-shaped piece of plexiglass with the words "The Big News" attached in styrofoam letters. It was suspended from the ceiling by a few chains and we all lived in fear that it would come crashing down on our heads on any given night. It was a nightmare for engineers to light and, after a year or so, we had the technology to achieve the same effect graphically. Nobody was sad to see that big overhang go.

After a consultant said the anchors were too far apart, we had this little half circle set built. It put us all closer together alright but Steve said it looked like we were all sitting around a poker table and I agree.

After a consultant said the anchors were too far apart, we had this little half circle set built. It put us all closer together alright but Steve said it looked like we were all sitting around a poker table and I agree.

This shot of the four of us is in front of the periscope set. Steve and I had a button which raised and lowered a TV monitor so we could talk to reporters and do satellite interviews live. We had a couple variations on this where a blue or green screen could be raised up and the director would superimpose the image on but that didn't last too long. Rather than building new sets every couple years, we'd just remodel the old ones. In fact, the set we've been using up until now, was first built in the mid 90's and simply upgraded and remodeled.

This shot of the four of us is in front of the periscope set. Steve and I had a button which raised and lowered a TV monitor so we could talk to reporters and do satellite interviews live. We had a couple variations on this where a blue or green screen could be raised up and the director would superimpose the image on but that didn't last too long. Rather than building new sets every couple years, we'd just remodel the old ones. In fact, the set we've been using up until now, was first built in the mid 90's and simply upgraded and remodeled.

  “Thanks, Nicole,” I said. “But I think I’ll pass on the chance to sit at the new set.”  

I had my turn at the old ones and, while I loved every minute of it, times and technologies change. This exciting new chapter in the history of Keloland is for others to write.  

What is comforting to me and I hope to all our viewers, is that amidst all the shiny new equipment and high definition imagery, the basic mission of Keloland Television remains as it always has; to be the station people trust for their news and weather. I know that sounds simple and maybe a bit schmaltzy but I also know Angela, Don, Jay and everyone connected with the news department take that responsibility and tradition very seriously.

I’m just glad that as station announcer I can still be a part of it all and very grateful that I will continue to be “heard” and not seen on television. There’s not enough air brush make-up in the world to make this aging face look good in HD.

Remember, Just Shoot The Pretty Ones

Posted: Saturday, October 15, 2011 at 8:48 am
By: Doug Lund
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I always found that one of the most difficult tasks for a reporter was trying to come up with something original to say when assigned to do a story about an event that happens every year. You know, like the craziness of early morning shoppers on the day after Thanksgiving..now called “Black Friday.”  Then there’s the “Parade of Lights” and “St Patrick’s Day” parade. Plus, we must not forget the yearly trek to the airport on the Friday before pheasant season starts to cover the arrival of out of state hunters. Perry Groten got that assignment again this year and always manages to round up a few guys with Southern accents to give entertaining answers to his questions. Perry tends to fly under the radar at Keloland but he’s just a wonderfully clever writer, a master of puns and a fine anchorman. Oh, and don’t ever get into a sports bar trivia contest with Perry because…well, you’ll lose.

Painting by Mark Anderson

Painting by Mark Anderson

I used to look forward to hunting pheasants in the fall but that was when I had cousins who lived on farms that were loaded with birds.
Getting permission to hunt wasn’t an issue and you didn’t have to pay for the privilege.
 You could sometimes get your limit by road hunting and not have to worry about being shot yourself by an angry farmer if you crossed his fence to retrieve a kill.
 Speaking of getting shot, my cousin Robert once came close to blasting me into oblivion on a hunting expedition.
 Pheasants don’t like to fly if they don’t have to and will often just run on the ground of an unpicked cornfield ahead of the hunters walking behind.
They’ll only take flight when they reach the clearing at the end and that’s where I..as the self-appointed blocker..would be waiting to nail them with my dad’s 16 gauge Remington pump action shotgun.
 Robert wasn’t too thrilled about doing all the hard work of walking the fields without ever getting a shot off so, in frustration, he forgot or disregarded all the hunter safety rules..lowered his 4-10 and opened fire at a rooster running just ahead of him.
A split second later I could feel bb’s whizzing around my head and making a “tick-tick-tick” sound as they sprayed into the dry corn stalks all around me.
When he emerged from the field and saw me standing there white with fear..he apologized and that’s when I believe I actually said, “ you idiot, you coulda shot my eye out!”

Aside from covering the annual arrival of hunters, you could always count on another Keloland tradition at the close of the Big News at 6 when weatherman, Dave Dedrick, would remind everyone heading to the fields to “Remember, only shoot the pretty ones guys.”

Painting by Terry Redlin

Painting by Terry Redlin

Dillon

Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 at 2:24 pm
By: Doug Lund
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It probably isn’t all that uncommon, but I was somewhat surprised to find little packets of Kleenex placed in the pews of Bethel Christian Reformed Church in Sioux Center, Iowa last Friday. They might have been just for those of us seated in the family section but before the service was over everyone in that overcrowded sanctuary would be searching for something to dry their eyes and blow their noses.

 dillonIt was at the annual Trudeau family Christmas get-together five years ago in Alcester when we all got our first glimpse of Dillon a 7 year old dynamo of a kid who was staying with Linda’s sister, Maria Hooyer and her husband, Paul on their Northwest Iowa farm. Dillon was pretty small for his age and a little nervous around so many strangers; understandable considering the traumatic, dysfunctional short life he’d had before finding sanctuary with Maria and Paul. Counseling and a variety of medications helped some.. but to have a real shot at normalcy, Dillon needed a solid loving family with plenty of patience.

“We’re thinking of adopting him,” Maria said after we finished our pot luck Christmas dinner. I remember my first thought  was why would you ever consider taking on that kind of responsibility at your age..after all, you already have a granddaughter and a son about to enter high school. In a few years you’d have the freedom to do all the things you’ve dreamed about.

I didn’t say anything, of course. None of us did because we’re all too familiar with Maria who is the most unselfish, caring and loving person anyone would ever want to meet and you’d be hard pressed to find a more gentle, hard working  better provider than Paul who would be an ideal father figure for this troubled kid.  So they began the long, tedious and frustratingly slow process of paperwork and court appearances until finally in August of 2008, Dillon officially became a permanent part of the Hooyer family.  It has been fascinating to watch him grow by leaps and bounds not only in stature but in his personality which has changed slowly but surely from fearful, apprehensive and rebellious to joyful and accepting. Oh, there were setbacks and frustrations but Maria and Paul managed to weather each storm with a balance of discipline and affection. For the first time in his young life, Dillon could trust people and dare to get comfortable in his surroundings at home, school and church. He grew to be passionate about music, sports, and especially helping with farm chores and fishing with his dad.

Last Tuesday, a missionary family had stopped by the farm for a visit. Their 5 year old son asked if he could have a ride on the ATV four-wheeler. Dillon was an expert on the machine and only too happy to accommodate. But he wasn’t expecting the little boy to get scared and grab hold of the handlebar where the throttle is located. Suddenly, the ATV raced toward a utility pole in the yard. Knowing there was going to be a collision; Dillon threw the boy off just before impact. It was a heroic gesture and also his last.

 Linda and I were sitting in a little New York City restaurant having a fine time enjoying dinner when Maria’s daughter, Heather, called. “What….What?” Linda said in disbelief at what she was hearing. “It’s Dillon,” she said after hanging up. “He’s dead.”

“How in the hell can God let this happen?” I thought. After all that Maria and Paul have gone through to provide a real home for Dillon who was finally happy and full of dreams. It’s not only unfair..it’s cruel. Loving god, indeed.

The service was going to be much too large for the small Catholic Church in Sioux Center so, in a demonstration of ecumenical unity, Bethel Christian Reformed generously offered use of its much larger church for the funeral mass.  I’m afraid my frustration with the almighty was only enhanced upon entering the narthex where a sea of flowers surrounded the open casket and several tables held so many photos and mementos of a life snatched away too young.

Oh, to have the faith of Maria and Paul who, while understandably devastated, greeted all who came..actually giving comfort to many of THEM with what can only be described as a divine dignity.

At the family service we learned that one day before the accident, Paul had given in and bought Dillon the cowboy boots he’d been asking for. He begged Maria to let him wear them to school on Monday and was thrilled when she said okay.

At the close of the funeral service Karri Faber performed a song that wasn’t on the bulletin. It was one of Dillon’s favorites by The Band Perry; “If I die young.”  The irony of the slightly modified lyrics turned all present into mush:

 If I die young, bury me in satin
Lay me down on a bed of roses
Sink me in the river at dawn
Send me away with the words of a love song
Lord make me a rainbow, I’ll shine down on my mother
She’ll know I’m safe with you when she stands under my colors, oh and
Life ain’t always what you think it ought to be, no
Ain’t even grey, but she buries her baby
The sharp knife of a short life oh Well,
I’ve had just enough time
So put on your best boys and I’ll wear my boots
what I never did is done
Send me away with the words of a love song.

 Rest in Peace young Dillon.

Home Again

Posted: Saturday, October 8, 2011 at 12:07 pm
By: Doug Lund
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Baseball fans in  Boston and New York are probably blaming our New England tour group for jinxing their teams. Both lost their chance at a World Series birth on the days we were there. 

At the end of this  last week, all 45 of us tired but happy explorers boarded our big Alaska-painted bus for one last time and made our way from Midtown Manhattan through the busy Lincoln tunnel over to the airport in Newark, New Jersey for the flight home.  

That's our motor coach in the background. Hard to miss with it's Alaska paint scheme that includes a grizzly bear.

That's our motor coach in the background. Hard to miss with it's Alaska paint scheme that includes a grizzly bear.

 Now, I wish I could invite you all over to the house for a big supper then roll out the screen and give you a slide show of all our pictures. That’s not possible of course..plus I remember how my mom’s good cooking and dad’s home movies could put dozens of relatives and friends sound asleep in minutes. So even though I run the risk of  causing you all to doze off, here are a few more highlights from our glorious time in New England.

We were anxious to try some real Vermont maple syrup. Who knew the best in the country was made in NEW HAMPSHIRE by this guy, Jim Fadden. He has the awards to prove it.

We were anxious to try some real Vermont maple syrup. Who knew the best in the country was made in NEW HAMPSHIRE by this guy, Jim Fadden. He has the awards to prove it.

This covered bridge in Woodstock, Vermont is one of several spotted on our tour.

This covered bridge in Woodstock, Vermont is one of several spotted on our tour.

hurricane damage house     hurricane damage pittsfield

I don’t think any of us were prepared for the amount of flood damage in Vermont and the Berkshires brought about by torrential downpours from Hurricane Irene in early September. Remarkably, most of the road damage had been repaired by the time of our arrival there.  All of the fun stops were open for business too including Bennington’s Apple Barn and Orchards in Southern Vermont.

Lots of pumpkins and unusually colored moose at the apple barn too

Lots of pumpkins and unusually colored moose at the apple barn too

Although our group had already been treated to apple pie and ice cream upon our arrival, Doc O'shea couldn't resist another Honeycrisp

Although our group had already been treated to apple pie and ice cream upon our arrival, Doc O'shea couldn't resist another Honeycrisp

The Berkshires are where many of the well-heeled elite from Boston and New York would come during the gilded age for a little R and R. They built humungous mansions for themselves and called them “cottages.”  

One of the smaller cottages is this one called Linwood built over a century ago by Charles Butler a big shot New York lawyer. It stands on an estate where the Normal Rockwell Museum is now located.

One of the smaller cottages is this one called Linwood built over a century ago by Charles Butler a big shot New York lawyer. It stands on an estate where the Normal Rockwell Museum is now located.

This is the view from lawyer Butler's cottage. That's Norman Rockwell's art studio in the background. It was moved here from downtown Stockbridge, Mass. After the Rockwell museum opened some 20 years ago.

This is the view from lawyer Butler's cottage. That's Norman Rockwell's art studio in the background. It was moved here from downtown Stockbridge, Mass. After the Rockwell museum opened some 20 years ago.

Inside Rockwell's studio. Note one of his infamous pipes at the lower right.

Inside Rockwell's studio. Note one of his infamous pipes at the lower right.

A quaint little tavern in Lenox, Mass. A person could overdose on "quaint" in New England but this place had the best clam chowder and French onion soup I've ever tasted.

A quaint little tavern in Lenox, Mass. A person could overdose on "quaint" in New England but this place had the best clam chowder and French onion soup I've ever tasted.

I wore my Vikings sweatshirt on Monday just to demonstrate my loyalty and to spite our tour guide and driver who are both from Wisconsin and Packers fans.

I wore my Vikings sweatshirt on Monday just to demonstrate my loyalty and to spite our tour guide and driver who are both from Wisconsin and Packers fans.

 

Our next stop was a tour of the Hancock Shaker Village. There are only about 4 actual Shakers left and the history of their religious sect is too detailed to go in here but our guides wore traditional Shaker garb and spoke of the Shaker's amazing religious fervor and innovative yet modest inventions.

Our next stop was a tour of the Hancock Shaker Village. There are only about 4 actual Shakers left and the history of their religious sect is too detailed to go in here but our guides wore traditional Shaker garb and spoke of the Shaker's amazing religious fervor and innovative yet modest inventions.

The Shakers were known for their amazing wood craftsmanship such as seen on display here at the village.

The Shakers were known for their amazing wood craftsmanship such as seen on display here at the village.

Our final destination; New York City. A local guide joined us for a  motor coach tour of Manhattan. One of the first stops was at the World Trade Center site and memorial. No one except special guests are allowed to visit the memorial just yet because construction of the new World Trade Center tower is underway and already soars above most city skyscrapers. Our viewing vantage point was from the Bank of America building across the street.

Seven Bank of America employees died on 9/11. Our guide stands before a special fountain built in their memory.

Seven Bank of America employees died on 9/11. Our guide stands before a special fountain built in their memory.

The new World Trace Center 1 reaching higher and higher

The new World Trace Center 1 reaching higher and higher

Site of the former twin towers and the new trees that mark the 9/11 memorial

Site of the former twin towers and the new trees that mark the 9/11 memorial

 

A stroll through Central Park

A stroll through Central Park

All  aboard the Liberty and Ellis Island ferry. Amazing view of the NYC skyline including the new WTC tower under construction

All aboard the Liberty and Ellis Island ferry. Amazing view of the NYC skyline including the new WTC tower under construction

The sun's reflection off Lady Liberty's torch made it glow as if actually burning

The sun's reflection off Lady Liberty's torch made it glow as if actually burning

Ellis Island. It's said the ancestors of 100 million americans passed through here

Ellis Island. It's said the ancestors of 100 million americans passed through here

The Great Hall where all immigrants had to be processed. 2% did not pass muster and were sent home. Can't imagine their dispair

The Great Hall where all immigrants had to be processed. 2% did not pass muster and were sent home. Can't imagine their dispair

One of the ferry boats that daily transport thousands of tourists to Liberty and Ellis Islands

One of the ferry boats that daily transport thousands of tourists to Liberty and Ellis Islands

Once again, New York City lived down to my expectations as far the incredible congestion and people with their condescending attitudes.. but we loved all the places we visited.  Both Linda and I agree that one of the most unforgettable experiences of our tour, and there were several, was attending the Broadway musical, “Anything Goes”  starring the Toni award winning actress and Broadway diva, Sutton Foster. We had great seats and the show was simply spectacular!

One of the Toni Award winning dance numbers from "Anything Goes."

One of the Toni Award winning dance numbers from "Anything Goes."

I know these Keloland/Holiday Vacations tours aren’t within everyone’s financial reach but if you ever find it possible, I’m pretty sure you’ll treasure the experience .

Cruises,Castles And Colors

Posted: Tuesday, October 4, 2011 at 6:47 am
By: Doug Lund
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Oooooh, Ahhhhhhh..

Sounds a bit like reactions to a 4th of July fireworks show here on the motor coach as we meander around the backroads of New Hampshire and Vermont on our New England Fall Foliage tour. Unfortunately, the sun, which makes the oak, birch and maple leaves look so dramatically bright  in blazing reds, yellows and oranges, has been pretty much a no-show. But even though the persistent cover of clouds and showers have been a bit of a disappointment for travelers, these mountains (hills, really) now have a taken on a different kind of splendor; a muted beauty of soft pastels.. pink, lavender and yellows which seem equally satisfying.

We stopped for a group photo somewhere in N.H. Beautiful.

We stopped for a group photo somewhere in N.H. Beautiful.

Linda beholds the pastel colors of the countryside from the balcony of our hotel in North Conway.

Linda beholds the pastel colors of the countryside from the balcony of our hotel in North Conway.

Paddleboat for our cruise of Lake Winnipesaukee

Paddleboat for our cruise of Lake Winnipesaukee

A bit rainy for the cruise but it eventually stopped so we could all sit on the outside deck.

A bit rainy for the cruise but it eventually stopped so we could all sit on the outside deck.

Parts of the movie, On Golden Pond was filmed here. I thought I saw a tall old skinny guy in a fishing hat looking very confused as he walked along his driveway.

Parts of the movie, On Golden Pond was filmed here. I thought I saw a tall old skinny guy in a fishing hat looking very confused as he walked along his driveway.

A guy who got rich making shoes built a castle in the clouds which was part of the tour. An amazing place.

A guy who got rich making shoes built a castle in the clouds which was part of the tour. An amazing place.

 We have a great group of vagabonds traveling with us here in the Northeast. We’re all going to have to go on diets by journey’s end.

Next some images from Stockbridge, Massachusetts and a visit to the Norman Rockwell Museum plus an afternoon at the Hancock Shaker Village; two unforgettable experiences.

Wish you were here but it’s going way too fast.